Leteti

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Leteti
(Divumagito proto)

1/?, unknown cause
Creator Clarke Other
Taxonomy
Domain
Kingdom
Subkingdom
Phylum
Class
Order
Family
Genus
Species
Eukaryota
Trinucleata
Maciotrinucleozoa
Siphonopneumata
Thermoptophora
Aerostatii
Divumagitidae
Divumagito
Divumagito proto
Epoch/Generation 1/142
Habitat Yokto Volcanic , Krakow Volcanic , Russ Volcanic , Flisch Volcanic , West Mason Polar Scrub , East Mason Polar Scrub , Mason Polar Beach
Size 1 cm Long
Support Unknown
Diet Herbivore (Airbulb, Towering Airbulb, Leafed Airbulb, Folding Airbulb, Zemliseme)
Respiration Unknown
Thermoregulation Unknown
Reproduction Asexual, Eggs



The leteti split from its ancestor, the hexcrawler. It now feeds exclusively on the airbulb and its decedents, and other, softer organisms. It has the ability to fly, albeit for short distances, by using three pairs of its flat, flipper-like appendages to push at the air. The top two of its breathing tubes have expanded greatly, have the ability to be closed, and are filled with ammonia from the airbulbs. This extra lift, along with the force of its appendages and Mason's weak gravity, allow it to float from one patch of airbulbs to another, avoiding predators and moving more quickly than its land-based relatives, although it has to land often to "refuel" and during the winter, where it will curl up inside the cavity of a folded folding airbulb to spend the night.

To better help it sense its environment, two of its primary oral tentacles have become specialized, developing their ancestors ability to detect heat much further, so when displayed allow the organism to spot individual flora and fauna. They are covered in a thick, gelatinous layer that is in turn enclosed by a thin membrane. The amount of disturbance on the membrane by infrared radiation is amplified through the gel, and picked up by the modified touch-sensors. The rest of its primary oral tentacles are similar in form and function to the teci, with the tentacles curled in its mouth until ready for use. Two of its body appendages have atrophied slightly, and are used to grasp the bulb of the airbulb by puncturing it slightly, enough to get a grip. Its gelatin-like eggs are laid inside of airbulbs in the fall, so that come spring, they will have an easily accessed food source available.


Living Relatives (click to expand/collapse)

These are randomly selected, and organized from lowest to highest shared taxon.
  • Mollisnite
  • Hexdigger
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